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Car scammers appear in Oregon newspaper classifieds, again

Previous victims explain, once money is wired or a payment is made electronically- the seller stops responding. Sign up for the daily 3 Things to Know Newsletter Sign up for the daily 3 Things to Know Newsletter In 2016, KGW reported a Portland man lost $2,000 to the car scam. An internet search shows the same photo of a 2008 Honda Accord appears in newspaper classifieds across the country. Most of the ads were posted within the past two to three weeks. They all included the same email address. It is not clear who is behind the ads. The telephone number, with a 541 area code listed in The Oregonian advertisement was disconnected. “We employ systems and processes that include both automated and human oversight in the placement of advertising on our platforms,” wrote John Maher, president of Oregonian Media Group in a statement to KGW. Maher explained that scammers are constantly changing their tactics to avoid getting caught. “Based on this dynamic, we regularly review and enhance our prevention efforts to minimize the possibility that fraudulent ads make their way through to the consumer,” said Maher. “In the event that we identify a potentially fraudulent ad after placement, we remove it as soon as possible.” NEVER wire money or use a bank-to-bank transfer in a transaction.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit https://www.kgw.com/article/news/investigations/car-scammers-appear-in-oregon-newspaper-classifieds-again/283-593580546

Newspaper reporting of NHS Cancer Drugs Fund misleading Analysis of UK newspaper coverage of the Cancer Drugs Fund was largely positive, but uncritical and unrepresentative of benefits to patients and society An analysis of UK newspaper reporting of the NHS Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF) between 2010 and 2015 shows that despite some critical analysis, the mostly positive stories are likely to have contributed to the CDF’s continuation, despite mounting evidence of its ineffectiveness. Close to £1.4 billion in total has been spent through the CDF which has subsequently been reconfigured and is now under the control of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). The research, published by the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine , was based on stories in nine national newspapers in the UK. As well as looking at whether stories were positive, neutral or negative, the researchers from the Institute of Cancer Policy, King’s College London and the University of Bristol measured the influence of each newspaper’s reporting of the CDF, based on circulation and number of stories. Lead researcher Dr Grant Lewison said: “Our analysis showed there was three times as much coverage in favour of the CDF as against. Media reports did not scrutinise the discrepancy between those drugs available through the CDF and those diseases with the greatest health burden, the toxicities of the medicines, nor the opportunity cost of the CDF for other cancer treatments.” He added: “Access at any cost was a clear totem around which the pro-CDF media based its coverage. The views of experts who pointed out the intrinsic unfairness of the CDF or the lack of efficacy of, and unpleasant side effects from, many of the drugs seem to have counted for little against the human interest stories of individual patients.” The preponderance of stories on chemotherapy, compared with surgery and radiotherapy, has, according to the researchers, probably contributed to a strong public perception that the best way to help cancer patients and improve outcomes is to allow them access to new (and expensive) medicines, whose performance is often hyped and gives rise to unreasonable expectations. The study also draws attention to the failure of many public organisations, including charitable research funders in the UK, to publicise the shortcomings of the CDF. Co-researcher Dr Charlotte Chamberlain, a palliative care doctor, said: “By uncritically reporting the assumed benefit of increased access to anti-cancer drugs we do our patients a disservice.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-09/s-nro091218.php

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